A Visit to the Scrub

On the way to the river you cross a little bridge where you’ll find some Green Arrow Arum whose leaves have a lovely shiny green appearance.

Green Arrow Arum

Continuing on you will start up a little sandy hill.  Look up and you will see a Sand Pine.  The needles are short and the bark is rough toward the base but almost smooth toward the top.

Sand Pine

When you reach the top and look around you’ll see the Largeflower False Rosemary –

Largeflower Large Rosemary 1

It is in the Mint Family and worthy of a closer look –

Largeflower False Rosemary 2

If you look on the left side of the trail you will see a little yellow flower with the common name of Candyroot and is a member of the Milkwort Family.

Candyroot

Look closely and you will see a little 4 petal white flower called Innocence –

Innocence

And speaking little white flowers with 4 petals, take a look at the Dahoons as they are starting to flower.

Dahoon Flower

That’s all for now – but standby for future postings.

 

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River or Creek – It’s All Just Water

When you get to the river –

River 2

Actually, you get to Evans Creek which flows into the North Fork of the St. Lucie River.  But that just sounds awkward, so I take poetic license and just use the word “river”.

And speaking of rivers, did you know that “Halpatiokee” is the Seminole word for River of Large Alligators.

Stand on the dock or, even better, sit on the bench and look around.  The water flows and the flora grows.  The Climbing Aster is the lovely pink and white flower

Symphyotrichum carolinianum 1 small

And it is climbing all over the Giant Leather Fern –

Acrostichum danaeifolium 2

White Mangroves abound – just look for the leaf with the notched tip

White Mangrove 1

That’s all for now – but standby for future postings.

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If anyone has pictures or words about the flora or fauna found on the Halpatiokee Trail contact me, so we can get you published.

Ancient Ferns

Walking around the gate and heading down the trail –

The Start of the Trail

The Start of the Trail

 

Nature provides a wealth of visual stimulation and one of the first thing that catches my eye are  the “cinnamon sticks” of the cinnamon fern (Osmunda cinnmomea).

 

Cinnamon Sticks

Cinnamon Sticks

 

Next time you see this fern take a close look at the cinnamon stick.  What you see are the casings housing the spores (sori).  You will see little round cases that have a slit opening across the top.  One side of the casing contracts as it dries which the case to split and the spores to be ejected

 

Osmunda cinnamomea 2

Cinnamon Fern Sori

 

Osmunda ferns date back over 200 million years and were around when dinosaurs roamed the earth.

Further down the trail another Osmunda caught my eye.  This time it was the royal fern (Osmunda regalis).  The leafs are a different shape and a little daintier  but the sorin casings look very similar.

 

Royal fern leaf

Royal fern leaf

 

Royal Fern Sori

Royal Fern Sori

 

That’s all for now – but standby for future postings.  If anyone has pictures or words about the flora or fauna found on the Halpatiokee Trail contact me so we can get you published.