Palms and Ferns

Somebody made the Trail a little more passable.  Saw Palmetto branches were cut back and laid on some of the muddy places.

Trail 13

 

One of the walkways has a new sign.

Trail 12

 

I missed getting a shot of a Ground Skink as it was just too fast.  But I did get a shot of this anole although he was doing his best to hide on the bark of a Slash Pine tree.

Anole

 

String Ferns were hanging from their home on this Saw Palmetto.

String Fern 1

 

And down by the Creek I found a couple of fiddleheads of the Giant Leather Fern.

Giant Leather Fern Fiddlehead 1

 

Here is a closer view of the fiddlehead – the patterns in Nature never fail to amaze me.

Giant Leather Fern Fiddlehead 2

The Shoe Tree

While walking the Trail it is hard to miss the rather large fern arising from the boots of the Cabbage Palm trees.  Lift up the leaf and you will see the spores of the Golden Polypoidy arraigned in 2 rows next to the vein.

Golden Polypody 1

 

But you don’t have to lift the leaf as you can probably fine on on the ground

Golden Polypody 2

 

But be careful that you avoid the Poison Ivy climbing on the tree limbs

Poison Ivy 1

 

Or that you don’t get grabbed by the tendrils of the Smilax vine

Smilax 7

 

But be most careful on this part of the Trail

Trail 11

 

For here lurks the shoe tree just waiting to reach out and grab your footwear.

Oak Shoe

A New Look for Some Old images

As a photographer I always strive to make my images appear as realistic as possible.  I process my pictures to reflect how the scene, plant, or fungi looked to my eye.  But there are different ways to “look” at things and there is nothing wrong with looking at images using a little more artistic license.

In one of the blogs I follow the author talked about images incorporating the Orton effect. This style of image has a dreamy look where the lights in the image were even brighter and the focus was a little softer.  The effect is  named after Michael Orton the photographer who popularized it.

Here is the original view of the Climbing Aster

Climbing Aster 2

 

 

And here is the view with the Orton effect

Climbing Aster 1

The intent is to give some subtle and pleasing changes not create a radically different image.

 

Here is the original of the Green Arrow Arum

Green Arrow Arum 1

 

And here is the view with the Orton effect

Green Arrow Arum Orton 2

 

Do you like the Orton look?

I like the effect.  That is not to say I’m going to use this on all my images but I did want to try it on a few more.  So I did and then put them into a slide show.  As side shows always seemed to be helped with music, I used a tune by one of my favorite Florida folk singers who embraces environmental causes.  Dale Crider wrote and sings this song about Marjorie Stoneman Douglas and her battle to save the Everglades.

Here is the link to slideshow.  I hope you will enjoy the images and the song.

Images Seen on a Trail to the River

Back on the Trail Again

Since I haven’t done a blog posting in awhile I decided it was time to stroll down the Trail and take some pictures.  I recently acquired a new smaller camera and a new small lens and I needed to test them out.  See what you think.

Sunlight was illuminating the air plants that covered the Live Oak tree.

Live Oak 2

 

As I love the texture of the bark, I thought the oak was worth another look.

Live Oak 1 (HDR)

 

The Spanish Moss appeared to have a golden glow in the sunlight.

Spanish Moss 3

 

As did the Turkey Tails on the tree.

Turkey Tails 3

 

A half dozen species of wildflowers were blooming.  Some of the Twinberrys, a member of the Coffee Family, were in flower.

Twinberry 7

 

Here is a Twinberry bud and, if you look along the right edge, you will see the twin red fruits looking like small match heads.

Twinberry 8

 

I was really pleased with the performance of the new camera and lens and was happy to get back on the Trail.

Another Look at the Staggerbush Fungi

Add another plant species to the list, some Swamp Sunflowers are out in bloom.  Big beautiful flowers that have really thin opposite leaves.

Helianthus angustifolius 1

But what really grabbed my attention was the fungi starting to grow on the leaves of the Staggerbush.  Back in April, I posted a picture of what I thought was a gall on a Staggerbush leaf.

Gall Wasp 2

Fortunately,  Rick Walker spotted my blunder and thus I learned that it is actually a fungus causing the growth.

The pathogen belongs to the Exobasidiaceae, a family which consists of 5 genera and 56 species. The species have a wide distribution, especially in temperate parts of the world.  They grow on the leaves of plants, especially those in the Ericaceae (Heath family).  Generally one species of the fungi is associated with on species of plant which may be why they show up on the Staggerbush and not on Fetterbush.

If you look close you can see the little thread-like micorrhiza on the surface.  So it was with some interest that I spotted this fungus starting to grow on the leaves of another Staggerbush.  You can see the leaf with the fungi starting to surround it.

Staggerbush Fungi 7

The threads of the micorrhiza remind me of a spider starting to weave a web.

Staggerbush Fungi 6

This is the view from the other side of the leaf.

Staggerbush Fungi 5

It’s always interesting to see some of the weird and interesting shapes we can find in trees.  I’m amazed that this oak could survive the damage it sustained when the limb broke away.

Oak 2

Zigzagging Down The Trail

In my visits to The Trail I rarely encounter another person and, for the most part, that is fine as I often spread out my photo gear out while trying to capture an image.  But as I strolled the Trail today I noticed how the vines and Palmetto fronds were starting to encroach and narrow the trail.  I guess there aren’t many people willing to brave a little mud and heat to see the wonders found along the Trail.

 Trail 6

In South Florida few trees have leaves that change color.  But one tree that does is the Red Maple and it’s leaves grabbed my attention.

 Red Maple 1

I found some paper wasps building a home under a Palmetto frond.

 Paper Wasp 2

Some little carnivorous plants, Zigzag Bladderworts, are coming to life.

 Zigzag Bladderwort 3

Down at the river, the lovely Saltmarsh Morning Glory was blooming.

 Saltmarsh Morning Glory 2

I missed the flowering of the Florida Butterfly Orchid but here is a shot of the seed pods.  When these open in a few months, the wind will blow the seeds far and wide and their life cycle will continue.

Florida Butterfly Orchid 3

That’s all for now – but standby for future postings.

Ferns and Oaks

Lining the banks of the river are the leaves of the Giant Leather Fern.

Giant Leather Fern 1

 

Here’s a closer look at the spores which cover the underside of the leaves.

Giant Leather Fern 2

 

Look up and you will see another fern, Golden Polyploidy, hanging from the limb of an Oak tree.

Golden polypody

 

An Oak also provides a home for the Southern Needleleaf air plants.

Southern Needleleaf 1

 

And finally, for a bit of color, here is the flower of the Sensitive Briar vine.

Sensitive Briar 2

 

If you are tempted to reach out and grab the flower, better think twice.  Here is a closer look at the sharp bristles along the stalk.

Sensitive Briar 3

 

That’s all for now – but standby for future postings.