Back on the Trail

I haven’t spent much time on the trail lately because George Rogers and I have been working on an on-line plant course.   But more about that later.  First, a few images that caught my eye.  Down at the dock the white mangroves are in flower.

Dock 2

 

Also there was the Saltmarsh Morning-Glory, a vine whose leaves remind me of a bird’s foot.

Saltmarsh Morning-Glory

 

Orchids and Arums were coexisting in some muddy water.

Orchid and Arums

 

 

And one of the tallest Carolina Redroots that I have seen is in flower.

Carolina Redroot 1

 

 

Here’s a closer view of the head because I love the texture of the flowers.  They look like they are coated with cotton.

Carolina Redroot 3

 

 

Now, about the course:

Native Plants of South Florida

An Introductory On-Line Course by George Rogers and John Bradford

Open Enrollment! Any tree hugger can join in!

Free! (except for book purchase)

Register now.  Begins Sept 1 2014

  • 16 habitat-based lessons. View the course at  http://nativeplantclass.weebly.com
  • You’ll need our self-published book: Guide to the Native Plants of Florida’s Treasure Coast.  To see the book, preview the class, open Lesson 1, and click a link to the book vendor. We make no money from the book—any revenue supports our web site.
  • Grab a field trip For each habitat type (most types span multiple lessons) you take a field trip on your own with camera in hand. We list suggested sites in our general area.
  • The class evolved in Palm Beach and Martin Students from anywhere are welcome.
  • There’s a quiz each lesson, and three Non-credit students use these as review exercises.
  • The mission is learning to recognize wild plants. There is no attention to gardening or landscaping (but see the book offered below).

To register or for more information:  John Bradford (cyclura@bellsouth.net) or George Rogers (rogersg515@gmail.com). After Aug. 18: George Rogers 561-207-5052

This on-line class is an open-enrollment public-access derivative of George Rogers’s “Plants of Florida Ecosystems” (ORH2511) taught on-line and in the field at Palm Beach State College in Palm Beach Gardens.  It is possible to take our on-line class for college credit, and it is possible to register for a credit-only field trip version of the class Fall Term 2015, perhaps after taking the free on-line class non-credit now.

A New Look for Some Old images

As a photographer I always strive to make my images appear as realistic as possible.  I process my pictures to reflect how the scene, plant, or fungi looked to my eye.  But there are different ways to “look” at things and there is nothing wrong with looking at images using a little more artistic license.

In one of the blogs I follow the author talked about images incorporating the Orton effect. This style of image has a dreamy look where the lights in the image were even brighter and the focus was a little softer.  The effect is  named after Michael Orton the photographer who popularized it.

Here is the original view of the Climbing Aster

Climbing Aster 2

 

 

And here is the view with the Orton effect

Climbing Aster 1

The intent is to give some subtle and pleasing changes not create a radically different image.

 

Here is the original of the Green Arrow Arum

Green Arrow Arum 1

 

And here is the view with the Orton effect

Green Arrow Arum Orton 2

 

Do you like the Orton look?

I like the effect.  That is not to say I’m going to use this on all my images but I did want to try it on a few more.  So I did and then put them into a slide show.  As side shows always seemed to be helped with music, I used a tune by one of my favorite Florida folk singers who embraces environmental causes.  Dale Crider wrote and sings this song about Marjorie Stoneman Douglas and her battle to save the Everglades.

Here is the link to slideshow.  I hope you will enjoy the images and the song.

Images Seen on a Trail to the River

River or Creek – It’s All Just Water

When you get to the river –

River 2

Actually, you get to Evans Creek which flows into the North Fork of the St. Lucie River.  But that just sounds awkward, so I take poetic license and just use the word “river”.

And speaking of rivers, did you know that “Halpatiokee” is the Seminole word for River of Large Alligators.

Stand on the dock or, even better, sit on the bench and look around.  The water flows and the flora grows.  The Climbing Aster is the lovely pink and white flower

Symphyotrichum carolinianum 1 small

And it is climbing all over the Giant Leather Fern –

Acrostichum danaeifolium 2

White Mangroves abound – just look for the leaf with the notched tip

White Mangrove 1

That’s all for now – but standby for future postings.

If you wish to get updated postings, email me at  cyclura@bellsouth.net  with your name and the word “subscribe” and I’ll add you to the mailing list.

If anyone has pictures or words about the flora or fauna found on the Halpatiokee Trail contact me, so we can get you published.